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Torts
University of Illinois School of Law
Gajda, Amy

TORTS – PROFESSOR GADJA – FALL 2009 OUTLINE
University of Illinois College of Law

Table of Contents

Intentional Torts           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2 – 7
General Concepts         .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2
Act       .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2
Constructive Intent       .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2
Transferred Intent         .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2
Mistake Doctrine          .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2
Insanity and Minority   .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2
Respondeat Superior   .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2
Privileges         .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2 – 3
Consent           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2
Self-Defense     .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           2 – 3
Defense of Others         .           .           .           .           .           .           .           3
Defense of Property      .           .           .           .           .           .           .           3
Necessity         .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           3
Discipline         .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           3
Legal Authority            .           .           .           .           .           .           .           3
Assault .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           3 – 4
Battery .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           4
False Imprisonment     .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           4 – 5
Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress      .           .           .           .           .           5
Misappropriation          .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           5 – 6
Publicity of Private Facts         .           .           .           .           .           .           .           6
Intrusion          .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           6 – 7
Defamation       .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           7
Negligence       .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           7 – 11
Definition         .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           7 – 8
Special Rules   .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           8 – 10
Duty     .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           .           8 – 9
Breach/Reasonable Person Standard   .           .           .           .           .           9
Res Ipsa Liquitur          .           .           .           .           .           .           .           9
Per Se (Statutory) Negligence   .           .

Before and After)
c.Implied (Social): Relationships, Norms
3.       Fraud, Duress, or Non-Disclosure: If this induces the consent, then consent is invalid
4.       Statutory Rape: Majority: Consent immaterial, Minority: Consent is relevant
5.       Criminal Acts: Majority: Can’t consent to crimes, Minority: Can consent to some
6.       Scope: Limited to substantially the same conduct
7.       Medical Consent: If no emergency, patient must be informed of options + risks
ii.      Self-Defense: Reasonable + Honest Perception of Immediate Threat
1.       Degree of Force: Force Reasonably Believed Necessary (Liable for Excess)
2.       Duty to Retreat: Before using deadly force, until dwelling (if attacker not a resident)
iii.      Defense of Others
1.       Majority: Only available if it would have been available to the other
2.       Minority: Available if reasonably believed to be available to the other
3.       Degree of Force: Reasonably “stand in the shoes” of the other
iv.      Defense of Property
1.       Reasonable Perception of Threat + Verbal Request/Belief Useless → Ordinary Force
2.       Spring Guns/Mechanical Devices
a.Gamble (Majority): Need reasonable warning, then only if you would have privilege
b.      Strict Prohibition (Minority): Totally barred (think firefighters, children, etc.)
v.      Necessity
1.       Trespass/Damage Property: Prevents harm to persons/property + No efficient alternative
a.Trespassed may have a tort claim against landowner if removed (Ploof)
2.       Need to Compensate: Will need to compensate for any substantial damage (Vincent)
Discipline (Teacher/Parent): Reasonableness is a jury